PENGETOUT POP-UP SHOP

PENGETOUT POP-UP SHOP

  Pengetout is a year-long initiative pop-up shop and workspace where nine new and expanding local businesses will share space to sell interesting products and services. The project is being delivered by Sally Williams from Retail Revival Ltd, who is well used to opening pop-up shops in London and funded by London Borough of Bromley and as part of their ‘Penge, Open for Business’ programme which also provides free training and support to new and existing local businesses. Sally contacted us to help with the branding and signage for the venture. We had just finished a report on Penge high street for the council and had already given branding advice workshops to local businesses, so it was nice to be involved in the next stage of the development for Penge High Street. The deadlines were tight in both time and budget, but we delivered on time and budget. The signage reflects the temporary nature of the store. It’s made out of off the peg letters and stencils on a background of pallets from various sources including Book Aid (who were happy for the space once the pallets had been taken away). They showed us around while we were there. The do great work, you can see more of what they do here: BOOK AID The original visuals showing the shop before and after looked like this: We think they are pretty close the finished thing. It was opened by The Mayor of Bromley, Councillor Ian Payne who cut a ribbon to officially declare the venture open. There was a real buzz and the opening with really positive feedback. You can find out...
THE ELECTRIC CAFE

THE ELECTRIC CAFE

Recently we were in Tate Britain and were looking through their bookshop and noticed this book about coffee shops in London. Then we saw their page on the Electric Cafe. We actually designed it as part of the high street regeneration we worked on with L.B. Lambeth and the GLA/Design for London. We got sign maker Butler Dsigns (more images in their link) to recreate the original sign which was badly damaged under the Pepsi plastic sign we had removed. The new sign is a hand painted direct copy of the original and was distressed and aged. The existing sign writing in the window was also retouched to make it more legible without losing what made it special and unique to start with. The New Sign:       This is what it looked like before: It’s been a cafe for years. We had the shop front painted to match the sign and a traditional awning installed by A25 awnings. The old plastic Pepsi sign we had removed was mounted on a wall inside (they are proud of the cafes history and there are vintage framed pictures of the cafe inside). Inside it’s a slice of the past with formica tables and rustic chairs. Nothing is corporate or over designed. Sometimes, a designer’s job is to be subtle and emphasise character and charm. It’s a great cafe, if you are in West Norwood, it’s well worth a visit. Oh, and their poached eggs are great! Say hi to Stavros if you pop in. We work on a lot of high street regeneration schemes and we are advisors to the Mayor of London and GLA on high...
WHAT CAN HIGH STREETS LEARN FROM SHOPPING MALLS?

WHAT CAN HIGH STREETS LEARN FROM SHOPPING MALLS?

High streets are important, both for community and for place. They help define an area as being more than a collection of homes, but over time many they have lost their way, and yet shopping malls wouldn’t be around today if it wasn’t for the high street. SHOPPING MALLS EVOLVED FROM HIGH STREETS.  My childhood was spent in a small town in North Devon. My local high street had free parking, but it was only a 15 minute walk from home, it had 2 cinemas, record shops, food shops, clothes shops, shoe shops, 1950’s style diners, ‘ye olde tea shoppe’, general stores, toy shops, 3-4 sweet shops, fishmongers, butchers, ‘fruit and veg’ shops, bakers, (note the plurals) stationers, amusements, book shops that specialized in certain different types of books, a library, restaurants, lots of bars and hotels and various markets. The signs were often hand painted, real works of skill, there was pride in how the shops looked and how goods were displayed. What worked especially well was that the bakers were close to one another, ‘fruit and veg’ shops were close to one another and all the restaurants were grouped together. The pavements were narrow, but because similar shops were nearby (and we used our own bags back then which were easier to carry) it made it easier to shop. The high street was logical, it made sense, the service was friendly, we knew many of the shop owners by name, there was a feeling of community and it looked great. If a shop didn’t have what you wanted, they would order it for you. In addition to...