PENGETOUT POP-UP SHOP

PENGETOUT POP-UP SHOP

  Pengetout is a year-long initiative pop-up shop and workspace where nine new and expanding local businesses will share space to sell interesting products and services. The project is being delivered by Sally Williams from Retail Revival Ltd, who is well used to opening pop-up shops in London and funded by London Borough of Bromley and as part of their ‘Penge, Open for Business’ programme which also provides free training and support to new and existing local businesses. Sally contacted us to help with the branding and signage for the venture. We had just finished a report on Penge high street for the council and had already given branding advice workshops to local businesses, so it was nice to be involved in the next stage of the development for Penge High Street. The deadlines were tight in both time and budget, but we delivered on time and budget. The signage reflects the temporary nature of the store. It’s made out of off the peg letters and stencils on a background of pallets from various sources including Book Aid (who were happy for the space once the pallets had been taken away). They showed us around while we were there. The do great work, you can see more of what they do here: BOOK AID The original visuals showing the shop before and after looked like this: We think they are pretty close the finished thing. It was opened by The Mayor of Bromley, Councillor Ian Payne who cut a ribbon to officially declare the venture open. There was a real buzz and the opening with really positive feedback. You can find out...
YOUR COMPANY’S BUSINESS CARDS DON’T ALL HAVE TO BE THE SAME

YOUR COMPANY’S BUSINESS CARDS DON’T ALL HAVE TO BE THE SAME

    I remember going into a meeting with 6 people from a large company. They all wore similar business suits and their business cards were all the same, bar the name and job title. After the meeting we couldn’t remember which card was for which person. We think this is pointless. The whole point of having people in a company is that they are different. They all have different roles, different strengths etc and work together to make a company stronger. They compliment one another. So why can’t your businesses cards do the same? As you can see above, our cards are a similar design, but are visibly different and help say something about us and the company. My cards are printed on recycled strawboard. They are printed letterpress in the UK in different colours by Typoretum. The deboss is deep, the edges are painted. They weren’t cheap but everyone we hand them too touches them and talks about them. They reflect our belief in respecting the environment, & ideas, well crafted. They were expensive per card, but worth it and have more than justified their investment with work won just because of the cards.   Ariana’s cards on the other hand are rubbish. Honestly. Some of the packaging we use at home or for work is cut and then stamped on the reverse side. It cuts down on waste but also fits in with our beliefs as a company. It also has a story, a sense of being hand crafted and is personal. But cards look similar, have a reason to exist but have a different personality.  ...
A STORY ABOUT A LONDON CHARCUTIER

A STORY ABOUT A LONDON CHARCUTIER

We met Simon at London Bridge after he contacted us to find out what he was doing and why he was doing it. He had trained as a chef but had a passion for charcuterie. He didn’t like things to be fake or designs that tried to hard. We talked about all sorts of subjects, not just his brand. When someone is the brand, it’s good to find out more about them than just what they want to promote and sell. We went away and a couple of weeks later met to show him the first stage visuals along with some different formats for packaging. He loved the first concepts but it was route two that he preferred, which luckily was also our favourite. Originally it was called ‘The English Charcutier’, but after undergoing many tweaks, the name changed and the original design lost some of it’s quirkiness (we had tried too hard) to be closer in nature to Simon, who really is the London Charcutier. And he really did have that beard. We amended the logo, more tweaks followed and new products and packaging formats came and went. Eventually it became a set of two products. Beef in Ale and Mackerel in Cider. Then the Duck in Sloe Gin joined the family and it became a range of 3 after over a years development time. We got the cutter drawn up and some samples made by Copypoll, the printer. It was printed on the uncoated side of the sustainably sourced board and delivered to Simon in time for his first orders. They source ethical and local high quality ingredients like local Five Points...
GHOST SIGNS, DESIGNED BY GOOD PEOPLE

GHOST SIGNS, DESIGNED BY GOOD PEOPLE

We love working on high street improvement schemes, especially when we have a chance to do something that builds on the character of the area. We are proud to be part of the Specialist Assistance Team to the Mayor of London and the GLA on high Street Regeneration. People shop mostly for things they want, how an area looks and feels is incredibly important. We are emotional beings. Making an area feel proud of itself, making them visible in ways that are also emotive and respectful to it’s heritage and built environment is something that really excites us. Bromley Council, who we have worked with before on shop front schemes, high street regeneration and as consultants commissioned us to design a ghost sign on the end of this building, incorporating the branding we had already designed for Bromley North Village. The white panel was already there, but any trace of a previous ghost sign had long since vanished, so we created a new one to add some signage announcing the area at one of the main entry points to Bromley North Village. It was painted by Peter O’Connor, a signwriter we have worked with many times before. We created a few different designs, here are the other versions. We researched the history of the building and found that it was originally Eastmans butcher, which we incorporated into the  first concepts. This evolved over time to the version that was painted on the building. A friendly landlord, good council officers and great sign writing made it all happen. Many thanks to Richard, Virgil and Peter. Here are some other similar signs we have...
A FAIR TRADE STORY, DESIGNED BY GOOD PEOPLE

A FAIR TRADE STORY, DESIGNED BY GOOD PEOPLE

It’s halfway though Fairtrade Fortnight so we thought we would share a liberating story with you. We have had a long relationship with Liberation Foods. They are the UK’s only fair trade, farmer owned nut company. In fact we were there right at the brands birth when we worked for a different agency. The people running it are passionate and believe in what they do. They are inspiring to work with and it was working with Liberation on their original branding that was in part, inspiration for us starting up on our own. We believe you do better work when you believe in what you do. The only way to take control of who we worked for was to start up on our own. So Designed By Good People was born in 2010 to work for clients who believed what we believed: that the world should be more ethical, less wasteful, more sustainable. Liberation is a personal brand, about the people and the products (which are amazingly tasty by the way*). The branding has hand drawn characters and type, bright funky colours to help differentiate the different products in the range. The characters appear in different positions on the packaging, holding banners or the barcodes on the back of pack. The rebrand included a new logotype, handrawn to match the feel of the rest of the brand, trade posters and banners, website, packaging for the nuts and peanut butter, social media icons and content, promotions, t-shirts, business cards and stationery. Each set of characters also became the stars of the business cards. The Liberation staff got to choose their favourite set of colours and characters. It’s been great working...
KIRKDALE BRANDING & GHOST SIGN MURALS

KIRKDALE BRANDING & GHOST SIGN MURALS

We were commissioned by Tony Buckley of SEE3, the Portas Pilot in Sydenham, Kirkdale and Forest Hill, to come up with ideas to help regenerate Kirkdale. Kirkdale is rather long with two distinct shopping areas split by a large stretch of residential housing. Many people coming out of Sydenham Station don’t know it has two parts. It is blessed by some amazing architecture, although sadly it has fallen into decline over the years and suffers from low footfall. We spoke to local traders and shared our ideas. We were told the area didn’t feel ‘proud of itself’, or ‘people don’t know this is still Kirkdale’. A few years ago the traders in Kirkdale, led by a local estate agent, had rebranded the area ‘Kirkdale Village’ but this proved unpopular in some quarters and historically Kirkdale was never a village. We believe that branding should be based on truth. The first step was to work on the name to solve the issue of the two shopping areas of Kirkdale. We researched the history of the area, again working with local historian Steve Grindlay (as we did on the mural on the Greyhound Pub in the other part of Kirkdale). ‘Kirkdale High Street’ was the chosen name as it harks back to it’s original name (Kirkdale was Sydenham’s original high street). The branding was based on the writing on the elegant High Street Buildings: The Branding: We designed ‘ghost sign’ style typographic murals for the side roads, lovingly hand painted by Peter O’Connor on the most visible strategic points in Kirkdale. The murals use a combination of ingredients already existing in Kirkdale. The border of one of the signs...