A STORY ABOUT A LONDON CHARCUTIER

A STORY ABOUT A LONDON CHARCUTIER

We met Simon at London Bridge after he contacted us to find out what he was doing and why he was doing it. He had trained as a chef but had a passion for charcuterie. He didn’t like things to be fake or designs that tried to hard. We talked about all sorts of subjects, not just his brand. When someone is the brand, it’s good to find out more about them than just what they want to promote and sell. We went away and a couple of weeks later met to show him the first stage visuals along with some different formats for packaging. He loved the first concepts but it was route two that he preferred, which luckily was also our favourite. Originally it was called ‘The English Charcutier’, but after undergoing many tweaks, the name changed and the original design lost some of it’s quirkiness (we had tried too hard) to be closer in nature to Simon, who really is the London Charcutier. And he really did have that beard. We amended the logo, more tweaks followed and new products and packaging formats came and went. Eventually it became a set of two products. Beef in Ale and Mackerel in Cider. Then the Duck in Sloe Gin joined the family and it became a range of 3 after over a years development time. We got the cutter drawn up and some samples made by Copypoll, the printer. It was printed on the uncoated side of the sustainably sourced board and delivered to Simon in time for his first orders. They source ethical and local high quality ingredients like local Five Points...
GHOST SIGNS, DESIGNED BY GOOD PEOPLE

GHOST SIGNS, DESIGNED BY GOOD PEOPLE

We love working on high street improvement schemes, especially when we have a chance to do something that builds on the character of the area. We are proud to be part of the Specialist Assistance Team to the Mayor of London and the GLA on high Street Regeneration. People shop mostly for things they want, how an area looks and feels is incredibly important. We are emotional beings. Making an area feel proud of itself, making them visible in ways that are also emotive and respectful to it’s heritage and built environment is something that really excites us. Bromley Council, who we have worked with before on shop front schemes, high street regeneration and as consultants commissioned us to design a ghost sign on the end of this building, incorporating the branding we had already designed for Bromley North Village. The white panel was already there, but any trace of a previous ghost sign had long since vanished, so we created a new one to add some signage announcing the area at one of the main entry points to Bromley North Village. It was painted by Peter O’Connor, a signwriter we have worked with many times before. We created a few different designs, here are the other versions. We researched the history of the building and found that it was originally Eastmans butcher, which we incorporated into the  first concepts. This evolved over time to the version that was painted on the building. A friendly landlord, good council officers and great sign writing made it all happen. Many thanks to Richard, Virgil and Peter. Here are some other similar signs we have...
GOOD PEOPLE STORIES 2: ARIANA’S STORY.

GOOD PEOPLE STORIES 2: ARIANA’S STORY.

Hola, I’m Ariana, one of the partners at Designed By Good People, but I almost became a lawyer. This is my story. I grew up in El Salvador during the civil war. We (my family) lived in the capital but most of the war happened in the countryside. But in 1989 the guerrila entered the capital attempting to overthrow the government. We were trapped at home during the fighting until we were evacuated by the Red Cross. Before leaving, my mum and dad made a white flag using one of my small pillowcases and a wooden clothes hanger. I was in charge of carrying the flag. We had to walk for what it felt like an eternity to an uncle’s house looking for shelter. I was only 9 years old at the time, but I found it rather bizarre, we went from what essentially was a war zone to a peaceful residential area. What I left a few hours before was still going on, but this time I was watching it on TV. Other members of my family weren’t quite so lucky. One evening an uncle was giving a lift to my mum and other relatives, my mum (with me in her belly) was one of the first ones to be taken home. Later on, as they carried on with their journey, they got caught in the cross fire between the army and guerrila, everyone in the car tried to duck down to avoid the bullets, but a cousin was shot and killed. Another uncle was kidnapped and tortured by the army and had to leave the country. He was a priest back in the the days when you’d hear the far right in the government say ‘be a patriot, kill a priest’. As...
A STORY ABOUT NAMES & BRANDING

A STORY ABOUT NAMES & BRANDING

Recently we took a walk in a place we hadn’t been before with our toddler. We turned a corner and suddenly a little voice said ‘look, Sainsbury’s’. He recognised the bright orange logo despite having only been in one Sainsbury’s store before.  The things is, he can’t read yet. He recognised it, he didn’t read it. To him it was just an image, a picture. But we shouldn’t be surprised, we are programmed to communicate in pictures more than words. Roadsigns are deciphered faster than words and our earliest forms of communication were cave drawings, way before language had even evolved. Yet despite this, so many businesses consider their names in isolation and then add branding to the name. The two things should be considered together. The two are linked. Our son is only a little over 3, so at present he has not attachment to the image he recognises as ‘Sainsbury’s’. It’s just a symbol to him, like a butterfly in the picture book. Over time an emotional attachment based on the experiences associated with that picture will form. This may be good or bad depending on those experiences. Sometimes clients expect a name, a logo, an identity to do too much. In essence, outside of first impressions, they are just flags, just something to say ‘this is what I’m called, remember me’. This applies to any business, large or small. If you think it’s important that your business is recognisable, and you should, perhaps the ultimate test isn’t to ask your friends, family or customers. Perhaps it’s better to ask a 3 year old. Then treasure them, nurture them and ensure...
GOOD PEOPLE STORIES 1: LEE’S STORY.

GOOD PEOPLE STORIES 1: LEE’S STORY.

Hello. I’m Lee, one of the partners at ‘Designed By Good People’ Business is about relationships. It’s good to get to know people. So I thought I’d do this virtually. No, don’t worry. I will try to keep this short but sweet. Let see, born in Nottingham, lived in a small seaside town called Ilfracombe for many years (everyone seems to have been there at some point in their lives), went to college at Somerset and was taught by one of the founding members of a design company called The Partners. Little did I know that they were one of the best agencies in the UK and I owe a lot to Malcom Swatridge, Brian Sweet and others. So thank you. I wouldn’t be sitting here writing this without you. After graduating in 1992 life was a struggle. Every design company I went to seemed to go bankrupt after I had an interview. Peter Saville left Pentagram after my interview with them! I thought I was responsible for the demise of Michael Peters, The Yellow Pencil Company and many others. I eventually got a job with Blackburn’s. We sat at desks facing a wall. The computers were in a separate room. All our visuals were done by hand and presented as mock ups. It was very old school, we even made our own rubdowns (if you don’t know what these are, please comment, it would be interesting to know how many people remember the term!). I got to be a whizz with the airbrush and often went home with multi-coloured fingers. For 2 years I worked on Walls Ice...